A Stone of Hope: A History Since 1898
(eBook)

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Published
The University of North Carolina Press, 2009.
Status
Available Online

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Format
eBook
Language
English
ISBN
9780807895573

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Citations

APA Citation, 7th Edition (style guide)

David L. Chappell., & David L. Chappell|AUTHOR. (2009). A Stone of Hope: A History Since 1898 . The University of North Carolina Press.

Chicago / Turabian - Author Date Citation, 17th Edition (style guide)

David L. Chappell and David L. Chappell|AUTHOR. 2009. A Stone of Hope: A History Since 1898. The University of North Carolina Press.

Chicago / Turabian - Humanities (Notes and Bibliography) Citation, 17th Edition (style guide)

David L. Chappell and David L. Chappell|AUTHOR. A Stone of Hope: A History Since 1898 The University of North Carolina Press, 2009.

MLA Citation, 9th Edition (style guide)

David L. Chappell, and David L. Chappell|AUTHOR. A Stone of Hope: A History Since 1898 The University of North Carolina Press, 2009.

Note! Citations contain only title, author, edition, publisher, and year published. Citations should be used as a guideline and should be double checked for accuracy. Citation formats are based on standards as of August 2021.

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Grouped Work ID455405d8-01ce-7d88-76e8-424e5a2fe6ab-eng
Full titlestone of hope a history since 1898
Authorchappell david l
Grouping Categorybook
Last Update2023-08-27 18:02:04PM
Last Indexed2024-02-24 03:16:48AM

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First LoadedMar 17, 2023
Last UsedJun 15, 2023

Hoopla Extract Information

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    [synopsis] => The civil rights movement was arguably the most successful social movement in American history. In a provocative new assessment of its success, David Chappell argues that the story of civil rights is not a story of the ultimate triumph of liberal ideas after decades of gradual progress. Rather, it is a story of the power of religious tradition.Chappell reconsiders the intellectual roots of civil rights reform, showing how northern liberals' faith in the power of human reason to overcome prejudice was at odds with the movement's goal of immediate change. Even when liberals sincerely wanted change, they recognized that they could not necessarily inspire others to unite and fight for it. But the prophetic tradition of the Old Testament--sometimes translated into secular language--drove African American activists to unprecedented solidarity and self-sacrifice. Martin Luther King Jr., Fannie Lou Hamer, James Lawson, Modjeska Simkins, and other black leaders believed, as the Hebrew prophets believed, that they had to stand apart from society and instigate dramatic changes to force an unwilling world to abandon its sinful ways. Their impassioned campaign to stamp out "the sin of segregation" brought the vitality of a religious revival to their cause. Meanwhile, segregationists found little support within their white southern religious denominations. Although segregationists outvoted and outgunned black integrationists, the segregationists lost, Chappell concludes, largely because they did not have a religious commitment to their cause.In a provocative assessment of the success of the civil rights movement, David Chappell reconsiders the intellectual roots of civil rights reform, showing how the prophetic tradition of the Old Testament--sometimes translated into secular language--drove African American activists to unprecedented solidarity and self-sacrifice. Martin Luther King Jr., Fannie Lou Hamer, James Lawson, Modjeska Simkins, and other black leaders believed, as the Hebrew prophets believed, that they had to stand apart from society and instigate dramatic changes to force an unwilling world to abandon its sinful ways. Although segregationists outvoted and outgunned black integrationists, the segregationists lost, Chappell concludes, largely because they did not have a religious commitment to their cause.-->
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